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Executive Assistant

Sep 3, 2021

Employee, 40 hours per week, Reconciliation Canada, North Vancouver, BC

The Organization

Reconciliation Canada is an Indigenous-led national organization that catalyzes meaningful relationships through values-based dialogue, leadership, and action. With a vision of “A vibrant Canada where all peoples achieve their full potential and shared prosperity”, we are dedicated to building partnerships with organizations that share our values and guiding principles. We are committed to humanity, building resilience, seeking diverse perspectives, and sharing knowledge. We steward a strong culture based on our core values and reflective of our commitment to diversity and inclusiveness.

Reconciliation Canada has been engaging individuals, communities, and organizations across the country in reconciliation initiatives, programs, workshops, learning experiences and events since 2012 to advance the work of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) and help find a New Way Forward. Our collective wellbeing rests with the relationships we build today.

As a diverse and inclusive workplace, we ensure everyone, regardless of who they are or what they do, feel equally involved and supported in all areas of the workplace. In our workplace, you feel welcomed, your ideas and opinions matter, you belong, you feel safe and bring your full and unique self to work.

As a values-based organization, we are open, curious and strive for understanding in a courageous manner.

Core Values & Beliefs

  •  ‘Namwayut – We are All One
  • Dignity
  • Hope
  • Openness
  • Understanding
  • Courage

Position Type: Employee, permanent, full time, 40 hours per week
Start date: as soon as possible
Location: Reconciliation Canada Office at 206, 1999 Marine Drive, North Vancouver & remote
Reports to: CEO


The Opportunity

The Executive Assistant (EA) reports to and partners with the CEO in organizing schedules and materials in order to focus on the right tasks, priorities, task completion, and meeting deadlines.

As the EA and personal assistant to the CEO, you will perform a variety of tasks including planning, organizing, and managing the CEO’s time. You are an expert at minding and attending to the details. You schedule and plan meetings for multiple people, prepare and brief the CEO for external, team and Board meetings (create agendas, speaking points, gather related documents, develop presentations, send out invites, attend meetings and compile minutes), make travel arrangements, and follow up on outstanding action items.

You support process improvement and efficiencies by creating templates, automating processes, and a work environment in which the use of paper is eliminated or greatly reduced. You monitor and respond to emails, manage the calendar, draft letters, prepare expense reports, schedule appointments and speaking engagements, maintain contact lists, produce reports, manage correspondence and presentation materials.

You have the opportunity to challenge what is, (the status quo), learn about and from others and have courageous conversations (on diverse topics that may be uncomfortable). You are encouraged to bring your whole self to work every day, lean into your voice, share your time and leadership with us. You ask where you can help; whether that’s helping your leader, your team, or your community. You work in a space where you feel comfortable to be yourself.

This role may require you to work a flexible schedule including evenings and weekends.

Education and Experience

  • Work experience in office administration is required
  • Demonstrated commitment to reconciliation, justice and wellness
  • Proficiency with technology including CRM and Google Workspace
  • Excellent communication, strong technical writer and ability to research
  • Strong problem solving skills and project management
  • Excellent time management with the ability to perform a variety of tasks
  • Detail oriented and well organized
  • Ability to take the initiative and maintain confidentiality
  • Aptitude for quick learning
  • Team player, you come from a place of curiosity
  • Self-directed, can work independently and have the good judgement to know when collaboration or additional direction will produce better results
  • Strong interpersonal skills with the ability to develop and maintain good relationships, approachable, empathetic, inspire and influence others
  • Strong leadership qualities, managing people and workflows for partners, funders, team, board memebrs, and other parties
  • Commitment to diversity and inclusion; open to diverse spiritual practices
  • Travel is required; able to travel and have a valid driver’s license
  • Speaking multiple languages including French is an asset
  • Eager to make a difference and have fun!

Total Rewards

We offer a competitive salary, health and dental benefits, wellness days, scheduled office closures, vacation and professional development opportunities.

Compensation will be commensurate with experience.

Join our team

Executive AssistantIf you value a professional work environment that is fast-paced, evolving and challenging with lots of opportunity for development, learning and contribution, we welcome you to learn more about this opportunity. You will join a small and highly agile team that is dynamic, diverse, forward facing and making a difference around the world.

Our collective wellbeing rests with the relationships we build today. We respect the unique needs, perspectives and potential of all our team members. We encourage and embrace diversity and inclusion in the workplace.

We would like to thank everyone for their interest in working with Reconciliation Canada. Due to the high volume of applications, only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

To apply, please send your cover letter and resume at [email protected] by Sunday, October 31st, 2021.

Download the full job description


How you can support Reconciliation Canada for Giving Tuesday

Nov 30, 2020

On Tuesday Dec. 1st, it is Giving Tuesday! 

What is Giving Tuesday? 

Giving Tuesday is a global movement about unleashing the power of the people to transform their world through giving, collaborating and generosity! It has grown into a movement inspiring millions of people to learn about the organizations that they can support and get involved in. We invite everyone to join us for the 8th annual #GivingTuesday and learn more about Reconciliation Canada and how you can get involved in the spirit of generosity and engagement. 

What does Reconciliation Canada do? 

Reconciliation Canada leads the way in engaging Canadians in dialogue and transformative experiences that revitalize the relationships among Indigenous peoples and all Canadians. We actively engage multi-faith and multi-cultural communities to explore the meaning of reconciliation. Together, we are charting a New Way Forward.

Untitled photo


Why should I be involved? 

Your involvement comes at a critical time. The enormity of racial inequity and health disparities are at the forefront of our daily lives. Now, more than ever we are responsible for creating a society that embraces our common humanity.

“Let us find a way to belong to this time and place together. Our future, and the well-being of all our children rests with the kind of relationships we build today.” 

Chief Dr. Robert Joseph

Your donation will amplify the message of Chief Dr. Robert Joseph, and support Reconciliation Canada’s new online strategy that will engage over one million new people in the reconciliation movement. Our goal is to reach $100,000 in the first five days. 

For one week only, your donations will be DOUBLED. Our friends Rudy and Patricia North are generously matching every dollar contributed to Reconciliation Canada! Please check out our donation page https://www.canadahelps.org/en/dn/45119

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7th Anniversary Impact Stories: Why We Walk

Sep 22, 2020

The “Why We Walk” campaign asked individuals to share their story and personal connection to the reconciliation movement. Stories were shared in the weeks leading up to the Walk for Reconciliation in 2017. Today, we feature two powerful impact stories to mark the 7th anniversary of our inaugural walk.

Brooke Fairley

“To me, reconciliation means giving respect to the first people and honouring the teachings of the land that we are so blessed to live on. I grew up on the land of the Squamish Nation and I have made so many friends and learned so many lessons from the Squamish People that I carry with me. More recently, I began working with a Squamish Nation elder. She always says “culture is our medicine.” That’s something that has really stuck with me. Through learning about her culture, traditions and teachings, I have really seen how culture is medicine. That’s where the healing comes from—resurging the teachings and the old ways.

I understand that we always see things through the lens of our own culture and our own lives. I am a white, fourth-generation settler so I always see things through my mainstream, dominant, privileged lens. I have learned so much from her to expand my own thinking and I recognize that I have been so honoured to work under her teachings. She has further abled me to understand my role as a settler, my role as a mother, my role as a human being and as a spirit on this earth.

To learn how to understand others, how to live with people, how to live with our land, and how to respect one another— that’s really what it’s all about. That’s what reconciliation means to me.”


Sphenia Jones

“I went to a residential school in the late 1950s. I was about 11 years old, and I worked in the infirmary there. I remember stealing foods for the kids or the babies in the infirmary because they were so hungry. I would take whatever I could find, like peanut butter sandwiches or even raw potatoes. When I got caught, I had to scrub floors with a toothbrush for four months. I tried my best to protect the kids in that school and, even today, they thank me for what I did because they remember being so hungry.

Lots of people say things like – “that didn’t happen” – but it did. They say – “oh, get over it” – but we have to talk about it first. Forgiveness is one of the hardest things we can do. I had a hard time forgiving the ones that abused me, but it was vital to get on with my life. I was anchored to the past, which made me sick. When I let everything go, I started getting better.

So, what does reconciliation mean to me? It means looking after the little ones which are the biggest hope for the future, and it means healing as our souls come together as one.”


Reconciliation News

Meet RC’s New Team Members!

Jul 30, 2020

In the midst of COVID-19, we have welcomed four interns and volunteers across North America to our RC team. We are incredibly excited to see the value they provide to our work in Canada and beyond this summer.


Shay L. Downey

Systems Change and Social Innovation Associate

Ancestry: Cherokee Nation of Tahlequah, Oklahoma

What does reconciliation mean to you?

Reconciliation includes an acknowledgment of past injustices to move forward toward a future with shared prosperity for all.

What is your favourite part about working at RC right now?

I love the opportunity for engaged scholarship while I apply my interest in Systems Change to the work of economic reconciliation for Indigenous Peoples of Canada. As I am living in Florida, USA, I am incredibly grateful for current technology and the ability to work with RC while being so far away.

What is a fun fact about yourself?

I am an opera-singing rugby player!

What is your current favourite quote?

“Do not go where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson


Katelynne Herchak

Community Engagement Coordinator

Ancestry: Inuk from Kuujjuaq, QC with ties to Nunavut & Nunatsiavut 

What does reconciliation mean to you? 

Reconciliation means love to me, to love yourself and to love people wherever they are in their path. 

What is your favourite part about working at RC right now?

What I enjoy about working at RC is like it feels like I’m working with family and it’s a great feeling. 

What is a fun fact about yourself?

I have two fun facts, one is that I was Miss Vancouver Island 2015 and the second is that Nelson Mandela and I are birthday twins! 

What is your current favourite quote?

“What counts in life is not the mere fact that we have lived. It is what difference we have made to the lives of others that will determine the significance of the life we lead.” – Nelson Mandela 


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Adrienne Ahn

Marketing and Communications Coordinator

Ancestry: Korean-Canadian

What does reconciliation mean to you? 

Reconciliation involves a process of unlearning and relearning the truth. It is about using your mind, body, and heart to find peace within yourself and others around you.

What is your favourite part about working at RC right now?

I love getting to know the people in this team and sharing dialogue, stories, and mutual respect for each other.

What is a fun fact about yourself?

I presented on SDG 5 and intergenerational equity during last year’s UN HLPF in New York!

What is your current favourite quote?

“Water teaches four important lessons: what you see is often your projection, what is soft can also be powerful, persistence can break barriers, change is always happening.” – Yung Pueblo


Jim P

Marketing and Communications Volunteer

Ancestry: Caucasian/Asian (Chinese)

What does reconciliation mean to you?

To me, reconciliation is foremost a process and a commitment to that process. It’s rooted in compassion, respect, and humanity and is marked by truth, justice, forgiveness, healing, and love. 

What is your favourite part about working at RC right now?

I’m incredibly grateful for the values-based approach that RC utilizes in its actions and purpose. It’s centred on bringing people together and working towards shared prosperity, which has helped me in processing and understanding our society’s dialogues on social and racial injustices.

What is a fun fact about yourself?

I was born and raised in the Texas Hill Country!

What is your current favourite quote?

“Reconciliation, really, at the heart of it all is this idea of love – of loving yourself and loving others.” – Chief Joseph


Statement on Multiculturalism Day

Jun 26, 2020

June 27th is Multiculturalism Day, a day that officially marks Canada’s commitment to celebrate the cultural and racial diversity that continues to flourish within our society. 

As we stand side by side to make our vision of a vibrant and inclusive Canada a reality, this day serves as an important reminder that we must unite as one and honour our differences.   

We acknowledge that not everyone experiences society in the same way.  We must respect the diverse, cultural contributions and unique gifts that each and every person brings to our land. Together we must educate ourselves and engage in collective dialogue to work towards building a multicultural world; our future depends on it.

‘Namwayut – We Are All One.


Why We Walk – Brooke Fairley

Sep 6, 2017

Brooke Fairley

“To me reconciliation means giving respect to the first people and honouring the teachings of the land that we are so blessed to live on. I grew up on the land of the Squamish Nation and I have made so many friends and learned so many lessons from the Squamish People that I carry with me. More recently, I began working with a Squamish Nation elder. She always says “culture is our medicine.” That’s something that has really stuck with me. Through learning about her culture, traditions and teachings, I have really seen how culture is medicine. That’s where the healing comes from—resurging the teachings and the old ways.

I understand that we always see things through the lens of our own culture and our own lives. I am a white, fourth generation settler so I always see things through my mainstream, dominant, privileged lens. I have learned so much from her to expand my own thinking and I recognize that I have been so honoured to work under her teachings. She has further abled me to understand my role as a settler, my role as a mother, my role as a human being and as a spirit on this earth.

To learn how to understand others, how to live with people, how to live with our land, and how to respect one another— that’s really what its all about. That’s what reconciliation means to me.”


The Why We Walk campaign asks individuals to share their story and personal connection to the reconciliation movement. Stories will be shared in the weeks leading up to the Walk for Reconciliation on September 24th, 2017.

We believe that every person has a story to tell and that by sharing these stories, people may feel a more personal connection to the reconciliation movement.

Learn more about the Walk for Reconciliation here.

Read more Why We Walk stories here.


Why We Walk – Sphenia Jones

Aug 30, 2017

Sphenia Jones

“I went to residential school in the late 1950s. I was about 11 years old and I worked in the infirmary there. I remember that I used to steal a lot of food for the kids or the babies in the infirmary because they were so hungry. I would take whatever I could like peanut butter sandwiches or even raw potatoes. When I got caught, I had to scrub floors with a toothbrush for three or four months.

Lots of people say things like “that didn’t happen”, but it did. They say “oh, get over it,” but we have to talk about it first. I protected the kids in that school with all that I had and I have now met about four or five people who I looked after in the infirmary. They thanked me because they said they remember being so hungry and they remember somebody feeding them.

Right now I am working on a project for child abuse victims which looks at getting homes for them. Our children need at least one safe place they can go to to spend the night away from getting hurt. I’m now one of the cofounders for the Empty Stocking Fund, the Christmas Bureau and Step Up Native School. I have such empathy for the little ones’ who suffered harm in the residential schools, but I’ve come a long way.

Sometimes it’s like a dream when I think about it, but then I pray and the hurt feeling goes away. Forgiveness is one of the hardest things we can do. I had a really hard time forgiving the ones that abused me, but I had to do that to get on with my life. I was anchored there and I was getting sick. When I let everything go, I started getting better.

So what does reconciliation mean to me? It means looking after the little ones which is the biggest hope I have for the future, and it means healing as our souls come together as one.”


The Why We Walk campaign asks individuals to share their story and personal connection to the reconciliation movement. Stories will be shared in the weeks leading up to the Walk for Reconciliation on September 24th, 2017.

We believe that every person has a story to tell and that by sharing these stories, people may feel a more personal connection to the reconciliation movement.

Learn more about the Walk for Reconciliation here.

Read more Why We Walk stories here.


Why We Walk – Dan Chambers

Aug 28, 2017

Dan Chambers

“Years ago, as part of the Truth and Reconciliation event held at the PNE, I was privileged to be a representative from the United Church who served as a “listener.” Very simply, if someone had suffered violence or harm from the residential school experience, I was there to listen. I was honoured to have a conversation with representatives of a family, including a mother, father and daughter. The daughter had been adopted at a young age into a Caucasian family due to the effects of the residential school experience that caused her parents to suffer. She was raised in a very loving family but as a Caucasian family it lacked the core Indigenous culture. The daughter was a remarkably well person, but she felt discombobulated because she was unwillingly divorced from her people and her culture.

As I heard their generational story and stories of others who still suffer in a variety of ways the affects of residential schools, I grew in respect and appreciation for the culture that Indigenous people bring to us and all that was lost. The TRC was a learning experience for me to see why healing is not so easy. You can’t just say “get on with it” because you think tragedy happened in the past. There is no easy or quick fix. bahsine güncel giriş

Reconciliation by definition is the mending of a broken relationship and clearly there is a relationship that has been broken. Reconciliation as I understand it is more of a process than an end. It’s the process of trying to understand each other and that ongoing process is something that I believe to be absolutely essential for Canadians to be a part of in order for Canada to be well —we don’t have any other option.”  bahsine giriş


The Why We Walk campaign asks individuals to share their story and personal connection to the reconciliation movement. Stories will be shared in the weeks leading up to the Walk for Reconciliation on September 24th, 2017.

We believe that every person has a story to tell and that by sharing these stories, people may feel a more personal connection to the reconciliation movement.

Learn more about the Walk for Reconciliation here.

Read more Why We Walk stories here.


Why We Walk – Laura Milne

Aug 24, 2017

Laura Milne

“My mom grew up in a remote area of Northern BC when she was a child. Her family had moved up there to open a general store that was quite far away from town. Their lives ended up becoming quite intertwined with the indigenous community there. Her father would trade dried goods from his store with some of the people for Mukluks for my mom and her siblings, and some kind people would pick her up on dogsleds to take her to school. It was this respectful, cooperative, healthy trading relationship that evolved naturally, and it helped my mom’s family grow accustomed to life in that region. imajbet giriş

Hearing her stories of growing up like that, I feel a gratitude to those people who became connected with her and who had stewarded that land for centuries before her family arrived. My mom passed along to me the values of respect and honour that must be upheld in our relationships with Indigenous people. So to me, reconciliation feels like a responsibility. There is so much healing that has to happen that we all must take part in. It’s easy to become overwhelmed by the work that needs to be done to mend the relationship, but we need to take whatever steps we can and trust that it will take time. It’s an honour to do whatever I can to steward reconciliation. I do my best, but I also know I have more to learn.” restbet giriş


The Why We Walk campaign asks individuals to share their story and personal connection to the reconciliation movement. Stories will be shared in the weeks leading up to the Walk for Reconciliation on September 24th, 2017.

We believe that every person has a story to tell and that by sharing these stories, people may feel a more personal connection to the reconciliation movement.

Learn more about the Walk for Reconciliation here.

Read more Why We Walk stories here.


Why We Walk – Hannah Mclean

Aug 22, 2017

Hannah Mclean

“Reconciliation makes me think of residential schools and what happened in the past. I want that to change and to make it better because it makes me feel sad that a bunch of kids like me were hurt. I know that some people are still angry at others and some people are happy with others and I think that reconciliation is important because it brings people together. It makes me feel happy that people are trying to change the world and make it better.”


The Why We Walk campaign asks individuals to share their story and personal connection to the reconciliation movement. Stories will be shared in the weeks leading up to the Walk for Reconciliation on September 24th, 2017.

We believe that every person has a story to tell and that by sharing these stories, people may feel a more personal connection to the reconciliation movement.

Learn more about the Walk for Reconciliation here.

Read more Why We Walk stories here.



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