Reconciliation News

Meet RC’s New Team Members!

Jul 30, 2020

In the midst of COVID-19, we have welcomed four interns and volunteers across North America to our RC team. We are incredibly excited to see the value they provide to our work in Canada and beyond this summer.


Shay L. Downey

Systems Change and Social Innovation Associate

Ancestry: Cherokee Nation of Tahlequah, Oklahoma

What does reconciliation mean to you?

Reconciliation includes an acknowledgment of past injustices to move forward toward a future with shared prosperity for all.

What is your favourite part about working at RC right now?

I love the opportunity for engaged scholarship while I apply my interest in Systems Change to the work of economic reconciliation for Indigenous Peoples of Canada. As I am living in Florida, USA, I am incredibly grateful for current technology and the ability to work with RC while being so far away.

What is a fun fact about yourself?

I am an opera-singing rugby player!

What is your current favourite quote?

“Do not go where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson


Katelynne Herchak

Community Engagement Coordinator

Ancestry: Inuk from Kuujjuaq, QC with ties to Nunavut & Nunatsiavut 

What does reconciliation mean to you? 

Reconciliation means love to me, to love yourself and to love people wherever they are in their path. 

What is your favourite part about working at RC right now?

What I enjoy about working at RC is like it feels like I’m working with family and it’s a great feeling. 

What is a fun fact about yourself?

I have two fun facts, one is that I was Miss Vancouver Island 2015 and the second is that Nelson Mandela and I are birthday twins! 

What is your current favourite quote?

“What counts in life is not the mere fact that we have lived. It is what difference we have made to the lives of others that will determine the significance of the life we lead.” – Nelson Mandela 


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Adrienne Ahn

Marketing and Communications Coordinator

Ancestry: Korean-Canadian

What does reconciliation mean to you? 

Reconciliation involves a process of unlearning and relearning the truth. It is about using your mind, body, and heart to find peace within yourself and others around you.

What is your favourite part about working at RC right now?

I love getting to know the people in this team and sharing dialogue, stories, and mutual respect for each other.

What is a fun fact about yourself?

I presented on SDG 5 and intergenerational equity during last year’s UN HLPF in New York!

What is your current favourite quote?

“Water teaches four important lessons: what you see is often your projection, what is soft can also be powerful, persistence can break barriers, change is always happening.” – Yung Pueblo


Jim P

Marketing and Communications Volunteer

Ancestry: Caucasian/Asian (Chinese)

What does reconciliation mean to you?

To me, reconciliation is foremost a process and a commitment to that process. It’s rooted in compassion, respect, and humanity and is marked by truth, justice, forgiveness, healing, and love. 

What is your favourite part about working at RC right now?

I’m incredibly grateful for the values-based approach that RC utilizes in its actions and purpose. It’s centred on bringing people together and working towards shared prosperity, which has helped me in processing and understanding our society’s dialogues on social and racial injustices.

What is a fun fact about yourself?

I was born and raised in the Texas Hill Country!

What is your current favourite quote?

“Reconciliation, really, at the heart of it all is this idea of love – of loving yourself and loving others.” – Chief Joseph


Reconciliation News

Reconciliation Canada COVID-19 Update

Mar 20, 2020

Dear Friends and Supporters of Reconciliation Canada,

We wanted to take a moment to update you on Reconciliation Canada during these uncertain times of the COVID-19 pandemic. For the safety of our staff and community members, we have made the decision to close the office and postpone all upcoming workshops and events until further updates. Our staff are working from home, and we are doing all we can to ensure these new working arrangements have minimal impact on our operations. For instance, we are now working towards providing some of our programming and initiatives through remote platforms and we look forward to sharing them with you soon.   

We are closely monitoring the spread of COVID-19 and its potential impact on the RC community. As the situation evolves, we will continue to provide further updates on our response. Meanwhile, feel free to reach out to our staff by email with any questions or concerns that you may have.

We wish you, your family and friends, safety and good health in these difficult times. We have every confidence that we can overcome this time of uncertainty by coming together as one and acting with the kindness, concern and empathy needed for the common good of all.


Sincerely,

The Reconciliation Canada Team


Announcement: No “Walk for Reconciliation” scheduled for 2018

Sep 5, 2018

Thank you for all the inquiries about the Walk for Reconciliation.

While we will not be hosting a Walk for Reconciliation this year (2018), we offer Reconciliation Dialogue Workshops, Lunch and Learns, and speaking engagements that build awareness of our shared history, engage people in meaningful dialogue and inspire community-based action.

These initiatives and services also help us work towards achieving funding stability, so that we may expand our programs and organize more large-scale community events like the Walk for Reconciliation.

Please click below to make a donation to help us deliver our work, move reconciliation forward, and create lasting change.

 

DONATE
 

To stay updated on news and upcoming events, please be sure to sign up to receive our monthly e-newsletter and follow Reconciliation Canada on social media (Facebook, Twitter and Instagram).

Thank you for your support and continued commitment to reconciliation!


Onjisay Aki International Climate Summit and the Climate Calls to Action

Jul 28, 2017

The Onjisay Aki International Climate Summit was held at Turtle Lodge in the Sagkeeng First Nation, Manitoba, Canada from June 8-10, 2017.  The Summit was led by Indigenous Peoples from the centre of the continent of Turtle Island (North America) who steered the proceedings by following Indigenous protocols of engaging and sharing ancestral knowledges concerning relationships with the natural world. Twenty-four speakers – Indigenous knowledge keepers and international climate leaders – were invited by the Turtle Lodge to represent the diversity of the human family, highlighting in accordance with Indigenous teachings that everyone has something to contribute.  

The following Climate Calls to Action, developed at the Summit, have been established in accordance with the Trail of the Turtle. They are steps that we must take to return to a balanced way of life, founded on stewardship of the Earth. Read more about the Climate Summit and the Climate Calls to Action here.

Follow these links to learn more:
Onjisay Aki International Climate Summit
Climate Calls to Action


National Reconciliation Gatherings – November 2016 // Réunions de réconciliation nationales – novembre 2016

Nov 28, 2016

November has been a busy month for the Reconciliation Canada team! This month, we hosted National Reconciliation Gatherings in Whitehorse, YT and Montreal, QC. These two gatherings wrap up a series of six National Reconciliation Gatherings that we have hosted throughout 2016, and form a significant part of our two-year initiative Reconciliation in Action: A National Engagement Strategy.

A sincere, heartfelt thank you to all those who made all of the National Reconciliation Gatherings this year a success and to all the participants whose presence made these gatherings so meaningful. We raise our hands to you all!


Le mois de novembre a été bien rempli pour l’équipe de Reconciliation Canada! Au cours du mois, nous avons tenu deux réunions de réconciliation nationales : une à Whitehorse, au Yukon, et une à Montréal, au Québec. Ces réunions ont clôturé une séries de six réunions de réconciliation nationales que nous avons tenues durant 2016, et constituent un volet important de notre initiative de deux ans : la Réconciliation en action : une stratégie d’engagement nationale.

Nous voulons remercier très sincèrement et du fond du cœur tous ceux qui ont fait des réunions de réconciliation nationales de cette année une réussite, ainsi que tous les participants qui, de par leur présence, ont rendu ces rassemblements pertinents. Nous vous levons notre chapeau!



National Reconciliation Gathering: Montreal – November 21, 2016 // Réunion de réconciliation nationale : Montréal – 21 novembre 2016
 


National Reconciliation Gathering: Montreal – November 21, 2016 // Réunion de réconciliation nationale : Montréal – 21 novembre 2016
 


National Reconciliation Gathering: Montreal – November 21, 2016 // Réunion de réconciliation nationale : Montréal – 21 novembre 2016
 


National Reconciliation Gathering: Whitehorse – November 4, 2016 // Réunion de réconciliation nationale : Whitehorse – 4 novembre 2016
 


National Reconciliation Gathering: Whitehorse – November 4, 2016 // Réunion de réconciliation nationale : Whitehorse – 4 novembre 2016
 


National Reconciliation Gathering: Whitehorse – November 4, 2016 // Réunion de réconciliation nationale : Whitehorse – 4 novembre 2016
 


Reconciliation in Action: A National Engagement Strategy,
a Canada 150 Signature Project, is funded in part by the Government of Canada

Réconciliation en action : une stratégie d’engagement nationale
est un projet de premier plan de Canada 150. Ce projet est financé en partie par le gouvernement du Canada.

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Igniting Reconciliation: Lighting the Sacred Fire

Sep 29, 2016

It’s early on Sunday, September 25th, 2016. The sky is a deep black, and a cool breeze carries the ocean spray and mist across the sand and driftwood. We are at Ambleside Beach in West Vancouver, on the traditional territory of the Squamish Nation. 

Several figures are gathered beneath a tent, pinning blankets with woven pouches and banknotes. A few metres towards the water, fire-keepers are making their final preparations. 

This is a significant morning. This is the morning of Igniting Reconciliation: Lighting the Sacred Fire. This ceremony, a traditional sunrise sacred fire ceremony, marks the beginning of Reconciliation Canada’s activities planned for 2017. This is a crucial year in the history of this country: 2017 marks 150 years since Canadian confederation. This coming year provides us with a unique opportunity for reflection and the chance to build new relationships that contribute to our collective well-being. The sacred fire will serve as a beacon of light to guide all people in Canada through the activities that are to be held throughout 2017. It is a way to mark the significance of the coming year and to ensure it begins with the best attitudes and intentions.

Shortly before sunrise, a crowd begins to gather. These individuals come from diverse backgrounds, and include Elders, Survivors and spiritual leaders, as well as representatives from Indigenous, youth, multicultural and multi-faith communities and organizations. Those gathered have accepted the vital responsibility of bearing witness to the ceremony, and carrying the messages received into their wider community. 

At 6:30am, the fire-keepers call the crowd together and the ceremony begins. 

The smoke from the fire gently surrounds us. Slowly, the sky turns to a cool, calm silver. The sun has risen and the ceremony is complete. The crowd begins to disperse, smiling and reflecting on the teachings of the ceremony. The weight of responsibility of acting as a witness is lightened by the support silently offered by those gathered.

Following the ceremony, those gathered made their way to the Chief Joe Mathias Centre for a shared meal.

As the crowd thins, the Reconciliation Canada team takes down the tent, folds the chairs and tables, and leaves the beach. Although no trace of the ceremony remains, the important messages and teachings stir us, and will remain with us throughout 2017. There is much work to be done, but this sacred fire will guide us through the activities of the coming year.

We express our deepest appreciation to the Coast Salish peoples for their generosity and leadership in hosting this ceremony, and we extend our gratitude to all those who made this ceremony possible. 


Igniting Reconciliation: Lighting the Sacred Fire was a Canada 150 Countdown Activation and part of the two-year initiative, Reconciliation in Action: A National Engagement Strategy. We are incredibly grateful for the opportunity to work in partnership with the Government of Canada in this area of national significance. 


Reconciliation in Action: A National Engagement Strategy,
a Canada 150 Signature Project, is funded in part by the Government of Canada

Réconciliation en action : une stratégie d’engagement nationale
est un projet de premier plan de Canada 150. Ce projet est financé en partie par le gouvernement du Canada.

Canada150


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Learn more about Reconciliation in Action: A National Engagement Strategy here.


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Reconciliation Canada Responds to Details of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

Aug 5, 2016

On Wednesday, August 3, the federal government officially launched an inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls. This is a moment long in the making, and we are full of hope.

This inquiry will bring light to what is happening to Indigenous women and girls across Canada, and we are hopeful that this will help many families and communities that have been in a dark place for so long.

While we are hopeful, we recognize that those conducting this sacred work must approach it in sensitive and safe way. It will be critical to recognize the impacts of the process on family members, friends, neighbours and loved ones – they must be supported and cared for throughout the inquiry.

We see this moment as an opportunity for each of us to reflect on our own role in this process. Each of us must ask, “what can I do to elevate and empower women and girls in our communities?” “What can I do to reinforce everyone’s intrinsic value and worth?” What can I do to raise up and support the families and loved ones involved?”

Answering and acting on these questions is an act of reconciliation, and this is something that all people in Canada must contribute to.

We are humbled by the courage of all of the individuals who never gave up hope. We thank all those who have made this moment a reality. We raise our hands to you.

Gilakasla.


An Evening of Reconciliation: Keynote and Cultural Celebration – Saskatoon

Jun 30, 2016
On June 8, Reconciliation Canada was excited to host An Evening of Reconciliation: Keynote and Cultural Celebration in Saskatoon. The event brought community members to the Wanuskewin Heritage Park.

Guests gathered the Outdoor Amphitheatre to experience a hoop dance and musical performance, followed by a instructional session where participants could learn the basics of hoop dancing.

Following the performance, Chief Joseph delivered a keynote address, speaking of the significance of the Wanuskewin Heritage Park, a gathering place for diverse peoples for thousands of years, and of the importance individuals from all backgrounds taking steps to make reconciliation part of their lives.

We are incredibly honoured for the opportunity to host this event. We offer our sincere gratitude to our partners and sponsors who made this event possible. Most of all, we would like to thank all those who joined us to listen and learn in this important celebration.

We look forward to engaging Canadians across the country as we continue to build a new way forward, together.


 


 

 

 

This event was made possible through the generosity of our Leading Corporate Sponsor and Partners.
 
Leading Corporate Sponsor:
 

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Partners 
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vancity
 
 
Vancouver Foundation
 
 

Survey by Environics Institute for Survey Research

Jun 29, 2016

On June 8, The Environics Institute for Survey Research conducted and released a new national survey “Canadian Public Opinion on Aboriginal Peoples”, which explored “non-Aboriginal public knowledge and
attitudes about Aboriginal peoples”. Reconciliation Canada, along with six other partners, provided support to this project.

The results show an unquestionable surge and growing number of Canadians, who did not self-identify as Indigenous, desiring reconciliation with Indigenous peoples in Canada.

More than eight out of ten of those surveyed now express a clear desire to be a part of reconciliation with Indigenous peoples. Eighty-four percent to be exact. This is up from two thirds in 2008. Perhaps most exciting is that this growth was most significant among young people, with an increase of more than thirty percent of surveyed between ages 18-29 believing they have an individual role to play in the reconciliation process.

Reconciliation Canada is extremely grateful for this growing trend towards new relations among all peoples in Canada, and we will work harder to provide support to this momentum.

You can read the full report from The Environics Institute for Survey Research here.


Canadian Public Opinion on Aboriginal Peoples Final Report was conducted and released by The Environics Institute for Survey Research, with the support of seven leading Indigenous and non-Indigenous organizations:

The Circle for Philanthropy and Aboriginal Peoples in Canada
Tides Canada
Institute on Governance
Canadians for a New Partnership
National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation
The Inspirit Foundation
Reconciliation Canada



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