September 30, 2021, marks the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation.

 

This is a day to recognize and reflect on the tragic history and ongoing legacy of residential schools. It is also a day when we can honour Survivors, their families, and Indigenous communities.

 

How you can participate in Truth and Reconciliation:


Challenge yourself to learn more 

This National Day for Truth and Reconciliation is an opportunity to not only reflect on what we know, but also take the time to learn more. Attend an event in your community, or explore some of the learning resources below.

 

Events this week

Learning resources

  • Bringing Our Children Home: Reflecting On Our Shared History

    In response to 215 children found buried at the Kamloops (Tk’emlups), Reconciliation Canada hosted a series of gatherings to help people understand our shared history. At each gathering, our expert panelists examine how we are all building the Reconciliation movement, exploring ideas that will help shape the future of Canada.

  • Reconciliation Through Education

    The National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation has a collection of educational resources to support teachers in raising awareness about why residential schools were created, their ongoing legacy, and how these have shaped the country we live in today.

  • Indigenous Canada

    The University of Alberta offers a free online course that explores Indigenous histories and key issues in Canada. This course explores key issues facing Indigenous peoples today from a historical and critical perspective highlighting national and local Indigenous-settler relations.

  • All My Relations

    This podcast explores what it means to be an Indigenous person today and to be engaged in relationships—relationships to land and place, to a nation, to non-human relatives, and to one another. All My Relations is a place to explore these relationships, and to think through Indigeneity in all its complexities.


Show your support 

Wear Orange

Before being officially recognized by the federal government, September 30 was known as Orange Shirt Day, started by Phyllis Webstad. Orange Shirt Day is an Indigenous-led grassroots commemorative day that honours the children who survived Indian Residential Schools and remembers those who did not. Wearing orange is one of the simplest ways to show some support for the day.

Donate to organizations working on reconciliation

We are at a time where it is crucial that this awareness and energy is translated into concrete change. Be part of the We are at a crucial time when our energy and awareness of residential schools need to translate into concrete change. Be part of the impact that keeps this momentum going by supporting organizations like Reconciliation Canada. Your support will help us continue our work to reconcile the pain of our shared history, and take new steps on a path of healing towards a better future for all Canadians. Support now


Be mindful 

It has been a very challenging year for Indigenous communities in B.C. and across Canada. Please be mindful of how sensitive this day will be for many.

Show consideration to those who are hurting by listening to those who are willing to share their stories and giving space to those who need it, and making an effort to take the next step in your own journey of lifelong learning on truth and reconciliation.